Are Reversing Cameras Mandatory in UK?

Are Reversing Cameras Mandatory in UK?

Reversing cameras, which provide drivers with a view of what is behind their vehicle as they reverse, are becoming increasingly popular in the UK. These cameras can help drivers navigate safely in tight or crowded spaces and can be especially helpful when hitching a trailer. But are reversing cameras mandatory in the UK?

In the UK, reversing cameras are still optional on many car models, which is why rearview dashcams are a popular aftermarket accessory. In comparison, US legislation has required all car manufacturers to include reversing cameras as a mandatory feature since 2018, but in the UK, it is up to the car buyer to choose a model with a rearview camera or pay more for options.

While some car manufacturers, such as Mercedes, Kia, Peugeot, Mazda, Citroen, and Audi, offer reverse cameras in a few units, it is not yet a mandatory or necessary feature to be found on all cars. Instead, it is typically offered as an optional extra.

Editor Remarks: When reverse cameras are missing in high-end cars, our prospects believe it can be a deal breaker for potential automotive buyers.

Nevertheless, we have no mandatory law in the UK, reversing cameras are used for road safety and here is how the legislation department rules in favour of dash cams and rearview cams.

Recommendations for Lorries (DfT Legislation)

According to the Department for Transport (DfT), reversing cameras are not currently mandatory in the UK. However, the DfT does recommend the use of reversing cameras, particularly for larger vehicles such as buses, lorries, and vans.

The DfT has introduced several initiatives aimed at encouraging the use of reversing cameras, including the “See Me, Save Me” campaign, which aims to reduce the number of accidents involving pedestrians and cyclists caused by reversing vehicles.

Rule of Road Vehicles (Construction and Use)

While rear-view mirror dash cameras are not currently required by law, several other regulations may require the use of reversing cameras.

For example, the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 require that any vehicle with a length of more than 7.5 meters (24 feet) must be fitted with an audible warning device, such as a reversing alarm, to alert pedestrians and other road users when the vehicle is reversing.

In addition, the same rule also requires that any vehicle with a length of more than 12 meters (39 feet) must be fitted with a rearview mirror and have wing mirrors on both sides of the front doors.

Insurance Implications (Fleet and Personal Transport)

While reversing cameras are not currently required by law in the UK, some insurance companies may offer discounts to drivers who have them installed on their vehicles. This is because reversing cameras can help reduce the risk of accidents, which can lower the chances of claiming your insurance policy.

If you are considering installing a reversing camera on your vehicle, it is a good idea to check with your insurance provider to see if they offer any discounts for having one installed. Consider installing a dash cam to record the front and rear ends of your vehicle to protect your insurance and avoid unnecessary road disputes.

Conclusion

In conclusion, reversing cameras is not currently mandatory in the UK. However, the Department for Transport does recommend the use of reversing cameras, particularly for larger vehicles. While reversing cameras is not required by law, there are several other regulations that may require

Ben Wells
Ben Wells is a tech enthusiast and expert in the field of auto accessories and electronic household items. With a background as a PC critic and editor for a tech blogger, Ben has spent the past four years writing objectively about home appliances and leisure technologies for BestB. Known for his unbiased coverage, Ben is passionate about staying up-to-date on the latest technological advancements in the automotive and home electronics industries. When he's not reviewing the latest products, Ben enjoys camping and travelling.